Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Xinxim- Chicken, Shrimp, and Peanut Stew- Brazilian Food Recipes

 

The dendê oil, roasted nuts, and coconut milk in xinxim are flavors that were originally brought to Brazil from Africa. This rich stew is often prepared for candomblé ceremonies.

This stew is about simple ingredients but with an exotic result. The favorite Bahian combination of chicken and shrimp comes together in a creamy sauce. The nuts serve as the perfect binding agents for the coconut milk and chicken stock but they have to be finely ground – if they are too coarse, they just won’t do the work. On the other hand, you have to be careful not to turn the nuts into a paste. The recipe can be prepared up to 2 days ahead of time and re-heats extremely well. If you prefer to make it ahead of time, it’s best to hold the shrimp and add them to the pan 5 minutes before serving.

I like to serve this dish by itself, but if you would like a starch to go with it, white rice or Farofa would be nice.

xinxim-chicken-shrimp-and-peanut-stew-brazilian-food-recipes


Preparation time: 10 minutes (plus 30 minutes marinating time)
Cooking time: 35 to 40 minutes
Serves 4 to 6


INGREDIENTS:

juice of 1 large lemon
2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. pepper
4 to 6 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
2 tbsp. dende or peanut oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 c. chicken stock or water
1\2 c. roasted peanuts, very finely chopped
1\2 c. coconut milk
1 fresh hot pepper or 2 preserved hot peppers, minced (optional)
1 lb. fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined, or 1 lb. frozen shrimp, thawed


PROCEDURE:

1) In a large bowl or baking dish, combine lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper to make marinade.

2) Wash chicken under cool running water. Pat dry and cut into 1-inch chunks. Place chicken in marinade, cover dish with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

3) In a heavy saucepan or skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and chicken pieces and cook 10 minutes, or until chicken is lightly browned.

4) Add chicken stock or water, peanuts, coconut milk, and hot pepper (if using). Reduce heat to medium. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 15 to 20 minutes, or until chicken is fully cooked and sauce has thickened.

5) Add shrimp and cook 8 to 10 minutes more, or until shrimp are pink. If you have dende oil, drizzle lightly over all before serving.


Try other... Healthy Recipes


Quick Tips:

You may be able to have fresh shrimp peeled and deveined at the grocery store. Otherwise, hold the shrimp with the underside facing you. Use your fingers to peel off the shell from the head toward the tail. Carefully use a sharp knife to make a shallow cut down the middle of the back. Hold the shrimp under cold running water to rinse out the dark vein.

Chicken Pieces. When cutting the chicken, aim for 2 wings, 2 breasts, 2 drumsticks and 2 thighs. If that takes up a lot of space in the pan and will require for you to use 2 skillets, you can also cut the chicken in 6 pieces, leaving the thigh and drum attached and cutting them apart only when they go to the braising stage. It is also possible to buy the chicken pre-cut from the market.

Dendê oil or Palm oil is an edible vegetable oil derived from the mesocarp (reddish pulp) of the fruit of the oil palms, primarily the African oil palm Elaeis guineensis, and to a lesser extent from the American oil palm Elaeis oleifera and the maripa palm Attalea maripa.

Palm oil is naturally reddish in color because of a high beta-carotene content. It is not to be confused with palm kernel oil derived from the kernel of the same fruit, or coconut oil derived from the kernel of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera). The differences are in color (raw palm kernel oil lacks carotenoids and is not red), and in saturated fat content: Palm mesocarp oil is 41% saturated, while Palm Kernel oil and Coconut oil are 81% and 86% saturated respectively.




Watch Video: Ximxim de Galinha


CALORIE COUNTER:

1) Chicken, Meat Only
chicken, chicken breast, meat

B- Grade
266 Calories

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 cup, chopped or diced (140 g)
Per Serving
% Daily Value

Calories 266

Calories from Fat 93

Total Fat 10.4g
16%
Saturated Fat 2.9g
14%
Polyunsaturated Fat 2.4g

Monounsaturated Fat 3.7g

Cholesterol 125mg
42%
Sodium 120mg
5%
Potassium 340mg
10%
Carbohydrates 0.0g
0%
Dietary Fiber 0.0g
0%
Sugars 0.0g

Protein 40.5g

Vitamin A
1% ·
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
2%
Iron
9%


2) Shrimps
shrimp, seafood

B-- Grade
33 Calories

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 oz (28 g)
Per Serving

% Daily Value

Calories 33

Calories from Fat 5

Total Fat 0.6g
1%
Carbohydrates 0.0g
0%
Dietary Fiber 0.0g
0%
Protein 6.4g



3) Peanuts, All Types, Dry-roasted
Without Salt
peanuts

B+ Grade
166 Calories

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 oz (28 g)
Per Serving
% Daily Value

Calories 166

Calories from Fat 126

Total Fat 14.1g
22%
Saturated Fat 2.0g
10%
Polyunsaturated Fat 4.4g

Monounsaturated Fat 7.0g

Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 2mg
0%
Potassium 186mg
5%
Carbohydrates 6.1g
2%
Dietary Fiber 2.3g
9%
Sugars 1.2g

Protein 6.7g

Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
2%
Iron
4%

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