Saturday, March 25, 2017

Instant Pot Ultimate Cooking Time Guide- (Accurate Electric Pressure Cooker Cooking Time Chart) - PDF Free Download

 

Food preparation for your family has never been this easy with the use of electric pressure cooker or Instant Pot

instant-pot-ultimate-cooking-time-guide-pdf-free-download
Photo credit: instantpot.com


So you are planning to use your electric pressure cooker on MANUAL MODE. Perhaps you want to start adapting your own recipes to cook under pressure. Or maybe you are the curious sort and wonder how long it takes certain types of foods to cook in a pressure cooker compared to an oven or stovetop. Either way, this Electric Pressure Cooker Cooking Time Chart has the information you need. It is filled with tables of recommended cooking times for five major food groups: beans and legumes, fruits, grains, meats, and vegetables. You need this "Instant Pot Ultimate Cooking Time Guide” to make the food you cook taste even better.

The recommended cooking times found in the following tables begin when the pressure cooker reaches high pressure. All cooking times are, at best, approximations and should be used only as general guidelines. Remember that in pressure-cooking; it is the size of the pieces of food that determines its cooking time, not the quantity. One portion will take as long as four.

Start with the shortest cooking time, every time; you can always continue cooking under pressure for an additional couple of minutes until the food attains the texture you desire. You may also find that your particular brand or model of pressure cooker cooks faster or even a bit slower. Therefore, feel free to revise or note any cooking time differences beside the recommended cooking time.

Always check if you have at least 250–300ml liquid in the pressure cooker (even if you are only cooking a small quantity) or the food might stick to the pot. However, liquid does not evaporate much when cooking under pressure so for casseroles, stews and soups you do not need as much as when cooking on stovetop.

You can download this handy guide in PDF format (printable version without cooking tips and explanations) for your convenience just click here… Instant Pot Ultimate Cooking Time Guide PDF free download.

How Hot is a Pressure Cooker Cooks?

In a sealed pressure cooker, the boiling point of water increases as the pressure rises, resulting in superheated water. You are in effect increasing the atmospheric pressure and therefore, increasing the boiling temperature of water. The trapped steam increases the atmospheric pressure inside the cooker by 15 pounds per square inch (psi), or 15 pounds above normal sea-level pressure. Steam from all that heat builds up in the locked pot. Water in a pressure cooker can reach a temperature of up to 121 °C (250 °F), depending on altitude. This higher temperature is what cooks food quicker.

At high altitudes, the pressure cooker is an essential kitchen tool. Food will cook faster and more thoroughly. Food comes out fork-tender and delicious.


Recommended Cooking Times Using Electric Pressure Cooker

VEGETABLES

If you think vegetables take too long to prepare, you have not tried cooking them in a pressure cooker. The list below shows you just how quickly you can cook a wide variety of vegetables. Learn… How to Keep Cooked Broccoli Bright Green, just tap the blue link.

Recommended Pressure-Cooker Cooking Times for Vegetables

Food
Cooking Time (in Minutes)

Artichokes, hearts
2–3
Artichokes, whole
8–10
Asparagus
1–2
Beans, fresh green or wax, whole or pieces
2–3
Beans, lima, shelled
2–3
Beets, 1/4-inch slices
3–4
Beets, whole, peeled
12–14
Broccoli, florets or spears
2–3
Brussels sprouts, whole
3–4
Cabbage, red or green, quartered
3–4
Carrots, 1/4-inch slices
1–2
Carrots, whole baby
2–3
Cauliflower, florets
2–3
Collard greens
4–5
Corn on the cob
3–4
Escarole
1–2
Okra
2–3
Parsnips, 1-inch pieces
2–3
Peas, shelled
1– 1- 1/2
Potatoes, pieces or sliced
5–7
Potatoes, whole, medium
10–12
Potatoes, whole, small or new
5–7
Pumpkin, peeled, 1-inch chunks
2–3
Rutabaga, 1-inch chunks
3–4
Spinach, fresh
2–3
Squash, summer, sliced
1–2
Squash, winter, 1-inch chunks
4–6
Sweet potato, 1-1/2-inch chunks
4–5
Turnips, sliced
2–3

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ALL KINDS OF MEAT

Remember that not all cuts of meat cook in the same amount of time. The table offers recommended cooking times for various cuts of chicken, beef, pork, turkey, lamb, and veal prepared in the pressure cooker.

Recommended Pressure Cooker Cooking Times for Poultry and Other Meat Types

Food
Cooking Time (in Minutes)

Beef, 1- to 2-inch cubes
15–20
Beef, corned
50–60
Beef, roast or brisket
50–60
Beef shank, 1- 1/2 inches thick
25–35
Chicken, boneless breast or thighs, 1-inch pieces
8–10
Chicken, pieces
10–12
Chicken, whole, 3–4 pounds
15–20
Cornish hen, whole
8–10
Lamb, 1- to 2-inch cubes
15–20
Lamb, boneless roast
45–55
Meatballs, browned
8–10
Pork, 1- to 2-inch cubes
8–10
Pork, ham shank
20–25
Pork, loin roast
40–50
Pork, smoked butt
30–40
Pork, tenderloin
15–18
Turkey, whole breast, bone-in
20–30
Turkey, whole breast, boneless
30–40
Veal, roast or brisket
50–60
Veal, shank, 1- 1/2 inches thick
25–35


How Long Does It Take to Cook Dried Beans and Legumes in Electric Pressure Cooker?

With the exception of lentils and split peas, the cooking times given are for cooking presoaked beans.

Why Do You Need to Soak Beans Before Cooking?

Recipes often recommend soaking beans in water overnight before cooking. A quick-soak alternative is to bring the beans and water to a boil and let them stand for an hour or so before cooking. Soak and rinse the beans to remove the phytic acid in their skins which block mineral absorption in the human body.

Soaking the beans overnight starts the hydration process. As a result, soaked beans cook up faster than unsoaked beans, and, more important, they seem to absorb water more evenly so the end result is a creamier texture. A quick soak (covering the beans with boiling water for an hour) is better than nothing.

Why You Should BRINE the Beans and Not Just Soak Them

Beans with tough skins have a tendency to burst in the process of cooking, spilling their starchy innards into the pot and finishing with a sticky, unappealing texture. 

Salting beans can help quickly tenderize their skins, preventing blowouts or bursting while cooking, which is the key to beans that cook up creamy rather than starchy.

Magnesium and calcium, two ions found in bean skins that act kind of like buttresses, supporting the skins’ cell structure and keeping them firm. Because calcium and magnesium ions form links between pectin molecules, they are responsible for creating strong cells that are tightly bound together. During soaking, the sodium ions will filter only partway into the beans, so their greatest effect is on the cells in the outermost part of the beans.

If you soak beans in salted water overnight, the sodium ions will react with the calcium and magnesium, leaving you with skins that soften at the same rate as the beans’ interiors.

How to brine beans? Dissolve 3 tablespoons salt in 4 quarts cold water in large bowl or container. Add dried beans and soak at room temperature for at least 8 hours or up to 24 hours. Drain and rinse well.

Food
Cooking Time (in Minutes)

Azuki beans
9–13
Black beans
13–15
Black-eyed peas
9–11
Chickpeas (garbanzos)
20–25
Cranberry beans
15–20
Gandules (pigeon peas)
15–17
Great Northern beans
12–15
Kidney beans, red or white
12–15
Lentils, green, brown, or red
8–10
Navy or pea beans
10–12
Peas, split green or yellow
8–10
Pinto beans
8–10

For the chickpeas shown above, it took will take the pressure cooker 15 minutes to reach full pressure, then 10 minutes at full pressure to cook the beans, followed by a 20-minute natural release cool down — a total of roughly 45 minutes to achieve very tender beans.

Do you know how to perfectly cook beans and legumes easily? Follow the link… How to Cook Beans or Legume.

How Long do You Have to Soak Beans Before Cooking?

Discard soaking water; cover beans with fresh water and two tablespoons of oil and cook. (Oil reduces foaming during the cooking process.) Overnight Cold Soak: Cover one pound of dry beans with six cups of room-temperature water and allow to soak overnight (12 hours or more).

How to Cook Beans in a Pressure Cooker Without Soaking?

Drain the beans: When the beans are done soaking, drain them in a colander or sieve. Place the drained beans inside the electric pressure cooker. Add 8 cups of water, 1 teaspoon of salt, onion, garlic, bay leaf and oil to the pot.


GRAINS

As you follow the guidelines below for preparing different types of grains in your electric pressure cooker, consider adding 1 tablespoon of oil to cut back on the foaming of the grain as it cooks.

Recommended Pressure-Cooker Cooking Times for Grains

Food
Cooking Time (in Minutes)

Barley, pearl
15–20
Barley, whole (unhulled)
50–55
Bulgur wheat, whole-grain
10–12
Oats, quick-cooking
6
Oats, steel-cut
11
Quinoa
7
Rice, Arborio
7–8
Rice, basmati
5–7
Rice, brown
15–20
Rice, long-grain
5–7
Rice, wild
22–25
Wheat berries
12–15

Become skilled at… Cooking Grains (rice and barley) Like a Professional Chef.


FRUITS

You can also cook dried and fresh fruit in a pressure cooker. This table will show you approximately how long different types and forms of fruits need to cook under pressure before they are ready for consumption.

Recommended Pressure-Cooker Cooking Times for Fruits

Food
Cooking Time

Apples, chunks or eighths
4–5
Apples, slices, dried
2–3
Apricots, dried
2–3
Apricots, whole or halved
3–4
Peaches, dried
3–4
Peaches, halved
4–5
Pears, dried
3–4
Pears, halved
4–5
Plums, whole or halved
2–3
Prunes
2–3
Raisins
2–3


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References:


America's Test Kitchen. 2013. Pressure Cooker Perfection.  America's Test Kitchen.  ISBN-13: 978-1936493418

Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough. 2015. The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book: 500 Easy Recipes for Every Machine, Both Stovetop and Electric. Clarkson Potter. ISBN-13: 978-0804185325

J. Kenji López-Alt. 2015. The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science. W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN-13: 978-0393081084

Jill Nussinow. 2016. Vegan Under Pressure: Perfect Vegan Meals Made Quick and Easy in Your Pressure Cooker. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN-13: 978-0544464025

Laurel Randolph. 2016. The Instant Pot® Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook: Easy Recipes for Fast & Healthy Meals. Rockridge Press. ISBN-13: 978-1623156121

Lorna J. Sass. 1994. Great Vegetarian Cooking Under Pressure. William Morrow Cookbooks . ISBN-13: 978-0688123260

The Editors of America's Test Kitchen and Guy Crosby Ph.D. 2012. The Science of Good Cooking (Cook's Illustrated Cookbooks), First Edition. Cook's Illustrated. ISBN-13: 978-1933615981

Tom Lacalamita. 2012. Pressure Cookers For Dummies, Second Edition. For Dummies. ISBN-10: 1118356454

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